Category Archives: Japan

Tomisato Central Park: Horse riding experience at the birthplace of pure Japanese horse breeds

Try horse riding at the birthplace of pure Japanese horse breeds

Tomisato City, Chiba Prefecture, used to be the home of the Shimofusa Imperial Farm under the control of the Imperial Japanese Administration. During the Meiji period (1868-1912), this farm became the first place to import and breed racehorses in Japan. There are a number of farms and places in the area where you can experience horse riding. In particular, around Tomisato Horse Park, there are many restaurants specializing in serving delicious specialties. So you can relax all day with horses.

Enjoy the views of the four seasons while riding a horse through the woods

A horse-riding club located right next to the racehorse ranch, Tomisato Horse Park’s vast campus consists of four large and small riding fields, three grasslands and a walking track. Take a leisurely horseback ride around the walking path while admiring the seasonal natural landscape of Tomisato like cherry blossoms in spring and red leaves in autumn. Fully equipped with showers and changing rooms, the club building regularly hosts interesting events such as a barbecue on the front lawn.

Enjoy Tomisato specialties at the equestrian club restaurant

Enjoy food on the terrace of the Cucina Tokionese Cozima Italian restaurant overlooking a horsebackground amidst rich natural surroundings. This restaurant serves a variety of dishes, made with local produce and organic vegetables grown on a natural farm. The dishes are made with a variety of seasonal vegetables such as Tomisato veggie pate and pasta with organic vegetables. The horse riding and walking combo is a unique menu that includes a delicious meal and a casual horse-riding experience.

Drop your soul into the nostalgic landscape in the countryside

The scenery of the rice field changes dramatically with the seasons, such as the scene of growing rice in spring, a green carpet of rice in summer and a field filled with golden rice in autumn. After riding, try to explore the area around this rice field. Alternatively, if you walk along Highway 409 towards the town of Yachimata from Tomisato Horse Park, a giant watermelon-shaped gas tank (a Tomisato specialty) is sure to keep your eyes off.

Sato monk won gold medal for horse racing

Japanese monk Kenki Sato unexpectedly won a gold medal in individual horse racing at Asiad 16, after excelling over two heavy opponents including Choen Jai Sik (South Korea) with his compatriot and also champion Yoshiaki Oiwa in the final round.

Japanese monk Kenki Sato unexpectedly won a gold medal in individual horse racing at Asiad 16, after excelling over two heavy opponents including Choen Jai Sik (South Korea) with his compatriot and also champion Yoshiaki Oiwa in the final round.

After the victory, Sato folded his hands to recite Buddha’s name and prostrated himself to heaven and earth. Only then did people learn and know that he was a monk since he was a child. Although Buddhism’s policy is to not compete with life the monk Sato is trying to combine his passion for horseback riding with Buddhism and create his special way of life.

Responding to the AFP news agency, Sato said: “I like to ride horses and do what a monk usually does. I take both of these things seriously. I think the practice can combine horse riding well and both can support each other.”

Sato’s father was also a monk, before choosing a religious path he used to be a famous knight competed by the representative of Japan in the 1980 Olympic Games. However, unfortunately because the Olympic Games in Moscow were boycotted, he could not finish. Dream of competing in the Olympic Games. So at 7 years old, Sato was taught to ride by his father.

Since then Sato enjoyed horse racing and always considered horses as close friends. Before each race, Sato often put some salt on horseback to find luck. After winning Asiad, Sato said: “I want to thank my horse. We both helped each other to win a special victory at Asiad”.

Painting cowhide like a zebra is a great way to protect the environment

What is cow hair paint like zebra? Why is the way to protect the environment?

According to a recent study published in PLOS ONE, scientists have proposed a strange project: zebra-like cow paint, whose purpose is to protect the environment.

All explanations are based on the hypothesis, the most common of which is that the stripes are responsible for scattering heat, helping zebras to regulate their body temperature in hot African weather. However, this hypothesis has been proved to be incorrect by the experiment.

After the above test, two more theories were considered to be quite relevant regarding this zebra coat. First, the zebra fur is a very special method of camouflage, which will create a visual illusion when they run and make the pursuers feel dizzy.

The second hypothesis involves distracting blood-sucking bugs: the reflected light in the black and white hair area is different, so the insects will have a geolocation noise and they will avoid the fur.

Based on these two theories, scientists in Japan have proposed the idea of ​​painting fur for zebra breeds. Specifically, experts painted a zebra coat for a group of cows, painted black stripes for another group of black cows, and left a group without any repairs. They then observed their fly-chasing behavior (wagging their tails, waving their ears), the number of flies and insects, counting each peanut and recording it.

Results showed that the “zebra” cows had a 50% lower rate of flies attack compared to the black and unpainted groups (the other two groups had no difference). In addition, the number of times they have to perform “chasing flies” of the zebra group is also less than 20%, because they are no longer bothered by bugs.

But what does that have to do with protecting the environment? It turned out to be completely related. The research team believes that this result can experiment on a large scale since current methods of killing flies when using cattle are mainly pesticides.

Zebra paint for cows is not only cheaper but also less toxic, makes them healthier and does not pollute the environment. This is a great alternative for pesticides, improving the quality of life for cows and non-toxic to humans. On top of that, it also eliminates the resistance of pests to insects.

The slowest horse racing in the world in Japan

In Hokkaido, the people who organize a slow horse racing and the horses finish the fastest do not necessarily win.

In horse races around the world, speed is always the most important thing. But for Banei, a form of horse racing on Hokkaido Island, Japan, strength and endurance are considered above all, according to odd.

Ban’ei race horses (also known as banba) unlike other fast-running thoroughbred horses. They weigh up to 1,200 kg and are twice as big as the small Dosanko horses, originating from Hokkaidō. Banba is a crossbreed horse from France and Belgium, appearing in Japan since the late 19th century to help farmers work in the fields.

Currently, it is considered a Japanese horse and is capable of carrying, pulling large loads. It is also used in paradoxical horse races on the island called: The slowest horse race in the world.

To participate in the game, Ban’ei race horses have to pull sleds weighing 450 kg to one ton on the sand race. They must also cross at least two steep ramps.

Du khách đến xem đua ngựa còn có thể tham quan chuồng ngựa. Ảnh: Navitime.

The horse trainer also participates in the race. But they don’t have to push their animals to run fast. Simply, they just encourage the horse to come forward. They can even ask the horse to stop to rest when having to overcome two obstacles. The winning animal does not depend on how fast or slow it is, but whoever has the strength to pull the sled to the finish is the champion.

The competition dates back to 1887 but it was not until the 20th century that the sport became popular throughout Hokkaido. During the heyday of 1991, the slow horse race was held in the cities of Obihiro, Asahikawa, Kitami, and Iwamizawa. Ticket sales amounted to more than 32 billion yen. However, shortly thereafter, the Japanese economy entered a recession and by 2006, there was only one horse race in Obihiro.

In 2012, the Banei slow horse race was recognized as an important cultural heritage in Hokkaido. Large sponsors of many companies have invested and spent money to preserve and develop this heritage.