Bareback Horse Riding (part 1)

Bareback horse riding is a great exercise  to build your strength and fine-tune your balance. If you have ever rode that way as you were a kid before switched to a saddle, still, the balance and confidence you have gained riding bareback will carry over to riding in a saddle, and besides bareback is a great. 

The first and foremost when riding bareback is safeness. You must make sure that your horse is “bareback-friendly,” otherwise, borrow one that is. At first, practise initially in a round pen or other enclosed small space for extra control. Remember to use protection gears such as a safety helmet, a bareback pad, mane, etc. although you can skip the spurs. A mane is a must in the beginning to avoid jabbing your horse in the mouth or gripping with your legs.

The very next thing to do is developing balance. You should relaxed, rely on balance, not leg grip, to stay on and follow your horse’s motion. How simple, isn’t it. Of course, it takes considerable know-how and practice. 

Here’s how to get started:

First, sit upright making sure that your position without a saddle should be similar to a correct position in a saddle. Don’t lean forward, drape’ your legs and allow them to lengthen, and lie naturally against your horse’s sides, without clamping or even wrapping them around his barrel. Keep your toes raised slightly or at least as high as the level of your heel.

Once you sit upright with relaxed legs, walk and jog on a straight line as much as necessary to begin developing a feeling of security. Whenever you feel tippy or slippy, grab mane—don’t grip with your legs.

Now you know the basic, it will take time to get familiar with the technique, however, as soon as you master them, you will greatly enjoy it.